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Mitrobates

Mitrobates was an Achaemenid satrap of Daskyleion under the reigns of Cyrus the Great, by whom he was nominated, and Cambyses. After Cambyses died, and during the struggles for succession that followed, he is said to have been assassinated, toget ...

Oroetus

Oroetus, or Oroetes, was a Persian Satrap of Lydia from ca. 530-520 BC, during the reigns of Cyrus the Great, Cambyses and Darius the Great, succeeding Harpagus, and being followed by Bagaeus. He is described by Herodotus in the third book of his ...

Bagaeus

Bagaeus, son of Artontes, was an Achaemenid nobleman, who was ordered by Darius I to kill the rebellious satrap of Lydia, Oroetes. Oroetes was accused of having killed Mitrobates, the satrap of Daskyleion and his son, but is best known as the mur ...

Hydarnes

Hydarnes idar), son of Bagābigna, was a Persian nobleman of the Achaemenid Empire in the late 6th and early 5th centuries BC. He was one of the seven conspirators against the usurper, Gaumata, who killed him and then proclaimed Darius I as the Pe ...

List of Chief Commissioners of Ajmer-Merwara

1927-1932: Leonard William Reynolds. 1944-1947: Hiranand Rupchand Shivdasani. 1905-1918: Elliot Graham Colvin. 1932-1937: George Drummond Ogilvie. 1937-1944: Arthur Cunningham Lothian. 1873-1878: Sir Lewis Pelly. 1918-1919: John Manners Smith. 19 ...

List of Chief Commissioners of Oudh

This is a list of Chief Commissioners of Oudh. The establishment of the title of Chief Commissioner of Oudh was created after deposing Nawab of Awadh Wajid Ali Shah and incorporating Oudh into British India by Company in 1856 until it was merged ...

List of Governors of Agra

This is a list of Governors of the Agra. The provisional establishment of the Governor of Agra happened in 1833 until the Presidency of Agra was renamed as North-Western Provinces in 1836.

List of governors of Punjab (British India)

The Governor of the Punjab was head of the British administration in the province of the Punjab. In 1849 the East India Company defeated the Sikh Empire and annexed the Punjab region. The Governor-General of India, Lord Dalhousie implemented a th ...

List of Governors of the Central Provinces and Berar

1902-1904: John Prescott Hewett. 1883-1884: William Bence Jones. 1884-1885: Sir Charles Haukes Todd. 1912-1920: Sir Benjamin Robertson. 1899-1902: Sir Andrew Henderson Leith Fraser. 1898-1899: Sir Denzil Charles Jelf Ibbetson. 1862 -1864: Edward ...

List of Governors of the United Provinces

This is a list of Governors of the United Provinces and the precursor offices associated with that title from the provisional establishment of the Governor of Agra in 1833 until the province was renamed as Uttar Pradesh after the Indian independe ...

List of Governors of the United Provinces of British India

This is a list of Governors of the United Provinces of British India. The establishment of the title of Governor of the United Provinces of British India happened in 1921 by renaming of title of Lieutenant Governor of the United Provinces of Agra ...

List of Lieutenant-Governors of the North-Western Provinces

This is a list of Lieutenant-Governors of the North-Western Provinces. The provisional establishment of the Lieutenant-Governors of the North-Western Provinces happened in 1836 until the title was merged with Chief Commissioners of Oudh and was r ...

List of Lieutenant-Governors of the North-Western Provinces and Chief Commissioners of Oudh

This is a list of Lieutenant-Governors of the North-Western Provinces and Chief Commissioners of Oudh. The provisional establishment of the joint title of Lieutenant-Governors of the North-Western Provinces and Chief Commissioners of Oudh happene ...

List of Lieutenant-Governors of the United Provinces of Agra and Oudh

This is a list of Lieutenant-Governor of the United Provinces of Agra and Oudh. The establishment of the title of Lieutenant-Governor of the United Provinces of Agra and Oudh happened in 1902 by renaming of the title of Lieutenant-Governor of the ...

William Fraser (British administrator)

On 13 January 1710, Lewis Melique, a European citizen of Madras presented a petition to Fraser accusing Khoja Safar, a prominent Armenian of St. Thomas Mount of sedition. Melique accused Khoja and other Armenians of St. Thomas Mount of conspiring ...

Edmund Montague

On the death of Gulston Addison, the then President of Madras on 17 October 1709, William Fraser was appointed as the President of Madras. However, as Fraser was then the Governor of Fort St David, Edmund Montague was made Acting Governor of Fort ...

Governors of Bencoolen

This is a list, source from worldstatesmen.org 1818 - 1824: Stamford Raffles - who enacted major reforms, including the abolishment of slavery, as well as founding of Singapore.

Chief secretary (British Empire)

Chief secretary was the title of a senior civil servant in various colonies of the British Empire. Prior to the dissolution of the colonies, the chief secretary was the second most important official in a colony of the British Empire after the Go ...

Aetius (praetorian prefect)

Aetius was praefectus urbi of Constantinople. He is first attested in office on February 23, 419, when an old man called Cyriacus tried to kill him in the Great Church, and again on October 4 of the same year, when he received a law preserved in ...

Ursus (praefectus urbi)

In 415 Ursus was praefectus urbi of Constantinople. On September 4, he escorted the relics of Joseph and Zechariah that were brought in the Great Church, he is attested in office by laws issued on October 31, 415, and February 17, 416. In 415 the ...

Constantine Gabras

Constantine Gabras or Gavras was the governor or doux of the Byzantine province of Chaldia, centred on the Black Sea port of Trebizond and its mountainous hinterland, the Pontic Alps, in northeast Anatolia, now part of Turkey. Gabras ruled Chaldi ...

Darius (praetorian prefect)

Darius was a Praetorian prefect of the East. He is attested in office between August 28, 436, when the law preserved in Codex Theodosianus XI 1.37 a was addressed to him, to March 16, 437, the day in which another law, preserved in Codex Theodosi ...

Strategius Musonianus

Strategius Musonianus was a Roman senator who served in various civilian offices from the reign of Constantine I through to Constantius II. Originally named Strategius, he was nicknamed Musonianus from the Emperor Constantine I, who was amazed at ...

Kanstresios

The kanstresios was an official of the Orthodox patriarchate of Constantinople during the Byzantine Empire. Ranked between a protonotarios and a referendarios, he supervised offerings. Those who have held this post include Manuel Dishypatos order ...

Kouboukleisios

Koubukleisios was a title conferred by the Byzantine emperors on ecclesiastic chamberlains, especially those of the Patriarch of Constantinople. The name is first attested in the Second Council of Nicaea in the year 787, and recorded in the writt ...

Skeuophylax

Skeuophylax, feminine form skeuophylakissa, meaning "keeper of the vessels", is an ecclesiastical office in the Eastern Orthodox Church. As a rule, is performed by a priest skeuophylax office is mandated to look after the sacred vessels and furni ...

Synkellos

Synkellos, latinized as syncellus, is an ecclesiastical office in the Eastern Rite churches. In the Byzantine Empire, the synkellos of the Ecumenical Patriarch of Constantinople was a position of major importance in the state, and often was regar ...

Baioulos

The term baioulos was used in the Byzantine Empire to refer to a preceptor or tutor of imperial princes. Only a handful of holders are known, but due to the offices close proximity to the imperial family, and the ties it created with future emper ...

Dishypatos

Dishypatos, Latinized as dishypatus, was a Byzantine honorary dignity in the 9th–11th centuries, intended for "bearded men". From then on, and especially during the Palaiologan period, it is attested as a family name. The name is relatively rarel ...

Konostaulos

Konostaulos or konostablos, later corrupted to kontostaulos / kontostablos, was a late Byzantine title, adopted from the Normans. The derivative dignity of megas konostaulos became one of the highest court posts in the Palaiologan period and was ...

Megas archon

The title of megas archōn appears originally as a translation of foreign titles, with the meaning of "grand prince", thus in the middle of the 10th century Emperor Constantine VII Porphyrogennetos calls the Magyar ruler Arpad as "great prince of ...

Megas dioiketes

The megas dioikētēs derives from the title dioikētēs "administrator", with the addition of megas, "grand". The dioikētēs was a provincial fiscal administrative post, which however was replaced in the early 12th century by the praktōr. Dignity is ...

Nipsistiarios

The nipsistiarios was a Byzantine court position and rank reserved for eunuchs. The office is first attested in a 7th-century seal, but was abandoned well before the 14th century, as it is not mentioned in the book of offices of pseudo-Kodinos. A ...

Oikeios

The term oikeios was used as an honorific designation and eventually as a formal title by the Byzantine Empire in the 9th–15th centuries. In philosophy, the adjective belongs to the same family of words as the Greek oikeiosis, Latin Tu, which pla ...

Ostiarios

The Patria of Constantinople mention an ostiarios named Antiochos in the 6th century at the time of Emperor Justinian I r. 527–565, and a 7th-century seal records an ostiarios and koubikoularios servant of the imperial bedchamber. As a pure digni ...

Panhypersebastos

The title of panhypersebastos was a Byzantine court title created by Alexios I Komnenos using the imperial root sebastos. It was always conferred to members of aristocratic families closely allied to the imperial family. Michael Taronites, Alex, ...

Proedros

Proedros was a senior Byzantine court and ecclesiastic title in the 10th to mid-12th centuries. The female form of the title is proedrissa.

Protosebastos

Although the title first appears in a document of 1049, where Domenico I Contarini, the Doge of Venice, uses it alongside the title of patrikios to refer to himself, it is commonly accepted that it was created by Emperor Alexios I Komnenos r. 108 ...

Rhaiktor

J. B. Bury assumed that the post was created either under Leo VI the Wise r. 886–912 or his father Basil I the Macedonian r. 867–886, but Nicolas Oikonomides restored it in the text of the Taktikon Uspensky of c. 843. The title is also found in s ...

Protosebastohypertatos

Sebastohypertatos was a Byzantine honorific title. The title formed the basis for a further compound title, protosebastohypertatos. These titles were part of the reorganization titelature under the Byzantine emperors of the Komnenos dynasty, wher ...

Sebastophoros

The sebastophoros was a high Byzantine court position and rank reserved for eunuchs in the 10th–12th centuries. Its functions are unclear.

Vestarches

Vestarchēs was a senior Byzantine honorific dignity in use from the late 10th to early 12th centuries. The term vestarchēs means "head of the vestai ", another group of high dignitaries of the court. Etymologically, these terms refer to vestiario ...

Vestes

Vestēs was a Byzantine court title used in the 10th and 11th centuries. The term is etymologically linked to vestiarion, the Imperial wardrobe, but despite earlier attempts to connect the vestai and the related title vestarchēs, the head of the c ...

Vestitor

The vestitor, Hellenized as vestētōr was a lowly Byzantine palace position and rank. As their name implies, vestitores were originally officials of the Imperial wardrobe Latin: vestiarium, adopted the Greek language as vestiarion, and the first e ...

Count of the Stable

The Count of the Stable was a late Roman and Byzantine office responsible for the horses and pack animals intended for use by the army and the imperial court. From Byzantium, it was adopted by the Franks, and is the origin of the post and title o ...

Count of the Tent

The Count of the Tent was a Byzantine military-administrative office attested from the 8th to the early 12th centuries.

Epi tou stratou

According to the Book of Offices of Pseudo-Kodinos, written shortly after the mid-14th century, the epi tou stratou was a subaltern official of the megas domestikos, the commander-in-chief of the Byzantine army. On campaign, he scouted ahead of t ...

Tzaousios

The tzaousios was a late Byzantine military office, whose exact functions and role are somewhat unclear. The term comes from Turkish çavus, which means "courier" or "Messenger", and was used by the Byzantines perhaps as early as the late 11th cen ...

Atriklines

The atriklines or artiklines was a Byzantine court official responsible for organizing feasts and banquets in the imperial palace. Along with maintaining order at imperial banquets, he was tasked with ensuring that guests were received in the cor ...

Kanikleios

The kanikleios, more formally chartoularios tou kanikleiou or epi tou kanikleiou was one of the most senior offices in the Byzantine imperial chancery. Its holder was the keeper of the imperial inkstand, the kanikleion, which was shaped as a litt ...